Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Why play a Campaign?

Why play a campaign? Campaigns offer a more realistic and diverse game. A type of game that is difficult to duplicate in a series of scenarios.

More realistic:
When playing a single scenario players often get into the "last turn" mode. The game is going to end soon, so I will make suicide attacks because it doesn't matter anyway. This is not very realistic, in the real world troops are not thrown away just because its 10:00 and you have to go home.
When playing a single scenario players often don't care how much they have lost just so long as the win. Again this is not realistic, in the real world commanders do not like to order an attack when they are not sure they can win. In a campaign game the survivors of today's battle must fight tomorrow's battle. If you take an objective but only have 1 light tank left, how are you going to hold it?
In the campaign games I've played, commanders have often by passed heavily defended positions in favor of attacking lightly defended rear areas. Players have attempted to flank a position rather than conducting a frontal assault.
When playing campaign games players should only run the units that are available for that time period. For example, when the first invasion of England, the Paneuropean should not run any Ogres, they were not invented yet. This will make for some interesting battles. If you want to run all the units available, pick a campaign later in the timeline.

More Diverse:
When playing a single scenario players often get into the point games, you pick 200 points I will pick 200 points. You start at one end of the board and I'll start at the other end. Last man standing wins. Although it is fun, after a while it gets old.


When playing a single scenario players often play the same units over and over. A prime example of this is the Paneuropean Fencer, before playing campaigns I rarely played the Fencer it was just not enough bang for the buck. But if I am playing an early game (before the Paneuropeans captured the Mark III templates) I usually have to run the Fencer. I had to develop new tactics to run the Fencer, it was quite fun.

When playing a single scenario players usually play two types of scenarios, the meeting engagement (equal strength forces, last man standing) or assault (smaller defender vs. larger attacker, capture objective).
A campaign opens up other types of scenarios.
Overrun:
The overrun happens often (a very small force is overrun run by a larger force) although not much fun for the smaller force, if the attacker is not careful he could lose valuable units in what should have been a easy victory.
Rear Guard:
The rear guard (a small force vs. a large force). In campaigns there is a lot of territory, units could be spread out all over the place. A rear guard action could give a player time to consolidate his defenses.
Raid:
The raid (a small/medium force vs. a large force). In campaigns there is a lot of territory, units could be spread out all over the place. A raid would be used to attack an opponents rear area, supply, command and control etc



"The material presented here is my original creation, intended for use with the OGRE system from Steve Jackson Games . This material is not official and is not endorsed by Steve Jackson Games."

" OGRE is a registered trademark of Steve Jackson Games, and the art here is copyrighted by Steve Jackson Games. All rights are reserved by SJ Games. This material is used here in accordance with the SJ Games online policy."